Topic: Culture and Identity

Native American Animals: The Turtle (Kéya) Symbolizes Mother Earth (Uncí Maká)

Turtle–Kéya The turtle is a sacred creature among Native American tribes. Each tribe’s cultural view of the turtle/tortoise, is slightly different; however, the deeper meaning remains the same: the tu...

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The Feather: A symbol of high honor

In Native American culture it is believed that all things possess an inherent virtue, power, and wisdom. The feather, for example, is a powerful symbol that signifies honor and a connection between th...

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March Spotlight: Celebrating Native American Women

March is also Women’s History Month, so we wanted to highlight inspiring Native American women, both past and present, who have made an impact in the world around them. The historical significance of ...

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Does basketball provide a sense of inner peace and purpose?

It never took much effort to find a game of basketball on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. If the weather was decent, all you needed was a ball and a hoop. When the sound of the ball slapping the pa...

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Live to Tell Podcast Seeks to Address Topics Kept in the Margins

While January is coming to a close, we cannot forget that each day Indigenous women and children are disappearing at alarming rates. Prevention is key and the best prevention is awareness. If you see ...

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Building Strong Women

Communality, it is a word borrowed from our Indigenous relatives of the South. It is defined as “the state or condition of being communal. A feeling or spirit of cooperation and belonging arising from...

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Part One: Acknowledging My Herstory and Identity for MMIWG

Tamara shares her journey to know herself through her mother’s MMIW story. An aspect that is often forgotten when someone goes missing or is murdered is the impact on the family—especially the childre...

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Part Two: Acknowledging My Herstory and Identity for MMIWG

Part 2 of Tamara’s story highlights her struggle to find answers surrounding her mother’s murder and her hopes that sharing her story will encourage others to break their silence. Native women and chi...

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Wounded Knee: Fear is Normally the Root of Tragedy

Fear is normally the root of tragedy. On December 29, 1890, that was the case: The Wounded Knee Massacre. This event was precipitated by the United States government’s fear of an uprising due to the p...

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